District of Columbia

Talking Points: Why We Can’t Wait For Superman

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2010-10-01
Type: 
reports

Since the release of the documentary Waiting for Superman there has been much media coverage and public discussion surrounding issues raised by the film. The film poses charter schools as a panacea—even though they serve less than 4% of America’s children, and research shows the vast majority don’t outperform public schools. These Talking Points are a tool that can help you reframe the discussion in your community and networks to create an echo chamber focused on systemic solutions that will provide a fair and substantive opportunity to learn for all children, not just a few.

Since the release of the documentary Waiting for Superman there has been much media coverage and public discussion surrounding issues raised by the film. The film poses charter schools as a panacea—even though they serve less than 4% of America’s children, and research shows the vast majority don’t outperform public schools.

Opportunity To Learn Messaging Toolkit

Publication Date: 
Mon, 2010-10-25
Author: 
OTL Campaign
Type: 
toolkits

Tools you can use: This toolkit can help you frame the education debates/discussions in your community - to focus on systemic solutions that ensure all children have a fair and substantive opportunity to learn, instead of solutions that may be popular with some but lack a positive track record and are not scalable.

Tools you can use: This toolkit can help you frame the education debates/discussions in your community - to focus on systemic solutions that ensure all children have a fair and substantive opportunity to learn, instead of solutions that may be popular with some but lack a positive track record and are not scalable.

The Strengths and Challenges of Community Organizing as an Education Reform Strategy: What the Research Says

Publication Date: 
Mon, 2011-01-31
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

New Report on Teachers: Students Who Need the Most Don’t Get the Best

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2010-11-18
Type: 
reports
Category: 
highly-effective-teachers

Nearly a decade after federal law was enacted to ensure that low-income students and students of color had a fair shot at being assigned to strong teachers, students in high-poverty schools are still disproportionately taught by out-of-field and rookie teachers.

Our Communities Left Behind: An Analysis of the Administration’s School Turnaround Policies

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2010-07-28
Type: 
reports
The school turnaround strategies being implemented through the School Improvement Grants program are time-tested and flawed. While the Obama Administration is right to call for dramatic action and to recognize that significant progress is not possible without added resources to support school improvement, it’s time to look at new directions.

No one disputes the critical need for action to improve low-performing schools. There is no question that thousands of schools across the country can and should do better—that both internal and external obstacles get in the way of delivering what we have always promised to all our nation’s young people: a free and excellent public education.

A Proposal for Sustainable School Transformation

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2010-07-28
Type: 
reports
Education Secretary Arne Duncan is right to call for dramatic action, and to recognize that significant progress is not possible without resources. The question is not whether to intervene in our schools, but rather, what interventions offer the best promise for successful and sustainable school transformation?

For many years, parent and community-based organizations have led the way in calling for dramatic action to improve low-performing public schools. The Department of Education, through its “Blueprint” for reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), and the already-implemented Race to the Top and School Improvement Grants (SIG) programs, has also called for substantive intervention, and has offered significant federal resources to improve low-performing schools.

Yes We Can: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2010-12-21
Type: 
reports

Yes We Can highlights that the overwhelming majority of U.S. school districts and states are failing to make targeted investments to provide the core resources necessary to extend what works for Black male students. Thus, in the majority of U.S. states, districts, communities, and schools, the conditions necessary for Black males to systemically succeed in education do not exist.

Yes We Can: The 2010 Schott 50 State Report on Black Males in Public Education, reveals that there are indeed communities, school districts and even states doing relatively well in their efforts to systemically enhance the opportunity to learn and raise the achievement levels for Black male students. However, Yes We Can also highlights that the overwhelming majority of U.S. school districts and states are failing to make targeted investments to provide the core resources necessary to extend what works for Black male students. Thus, in the majority of U.S.

2025 Campaign for Black Men and Boys

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2010-12-14

Opportunity To Learn Talking Points

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2010-10-01
Type: 
reports
Tools you can use: These Talking Points can help you frame the education debates/discussions in your community—to focus on systemic solutions that ensure all children have a fair and substantive opportunity to learn, rather than the lottery-driven options that haven’t been proven and aren’t scalable.

Tools you can use: These Talking Points can help you frame the education debates/discussions in your community—to focus on systemic solutions that ensure all children have a fair and substantive opportunity to learn, rather than the lottery-driven options that haven’t been proven and aren’t scalable.

Civil Rights Framework Media Release

Publication Date: 
Mon, 2010-07-26

DOWNLOAD PDF OF THE RELEASE (265 KB)

 

Embargoed for release until
Monday, July 26, 2010, 10 AM

For more information contact:

Kari Hudnell (202) 955-9450 x 318
[email protected]

Stephanie Dukes (202) 955-9450 x 314
[email protected]

Prominent Civil Rights Leaders Unite to Push for a Federal Education Agenda That Gives All Students an “Opportunity To Learn”

WASHINGTON – July 26, 2010 –Prominent civil-rights leaders today joined force to call for the adoption of federal education policies that create the framework and conditions necessary to achieve equitable opportunities for all.

The leaders called on the Obama Administration and Congress to revamp the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) by leveraging federal resources available to all states. As a part of extending an opportunity to learn as a right, the leaders asked the President to demand and support universal access to early education for students in all states. They also seek to ensure that all students have access to highly effective teachers. Their plan calls for providing incentives to recruit and retain highly effective educators and improve the teaching and learning conditions in high–need, low-income, and rural areas. Their plan also urges the federal government to institutionalize a national resource accountability system so that all students and parents will live within communities with the type of educational systems where students can achieve high outcomes.

Addressing Resource Inequities

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - District of Columbia