philanthropy

Infographic: LGBTQ Students Need Help, and Philanthropy Needs to Step Up

A new infographic released today highlights the challenges facing LGBTQ students and analyzes trends, gaps, and opportunities in funding for LGBTQ education issues.

Produced in partnership between Funders for LGBTQ Issues and Schott, we hope this infographic will help both those in philanthropy and LGBTQ advocates to chart a better course toward a future where all LGBTQ youth attend well-resourced, supportive and safe public schools.

A new infographic released today highlights the challenges facing LGBTQ students and analyzes trends, gaps, and opportunities in funding for LGBTQ education issues.

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A Long Stare in the Mirror

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2019-09-05
Edgar Villanueva, author of Decolonizing Wealth, says philanthropy needs to take a long stare in the mirror. He’s a leading voice in the push for real equity and inclusion in the sector. “We need to look back at our history,” he said. “We exist with all these contradictions and we have to understand that the work of equity is messy. This is intentional work that we have to do every single day. How far are we willing to go to change things so that it’s not in service of our own comfort?”

Edgar Villanueva, author of Decolonizing Wealth, says philanthropy needs to take a long stare in the mirror. He’s a leading voice in the push for real equity and inclusion in the sector. “We need to look back at our history,” he said. “We exist with all these contradictions and we have to understand that the work of equity is messy. This is intentional work that we have to do every single day. How far are we willing to go to change things so that it’s not in service of our own comfort?”

Video produced by the Skoll Foundation.

Grantee Partners Meet to Fundraise for the Front Lines

This week we were proud to host a room full of our grantee partners to strengthen our collective fundraising skills and strategies. "Fundraising for the Front Lines" was a two-day training led by Marjorie Fine and Sheena Brown and hosted at the Ford Foundation offices in New York City.

This week we were proud to host dozens of grantee partners from across the country to strengthen our collective fundraising skills and strategies. "Fundraising for the Front Lines" was a two-day training led by Marjorie Fine and Sheena Brown, hosted at the Ford Foundation offices in New York City. Fine brought her hard-won experience over a career of fundraising for grassroots organizing, especially during her tenure leading the North Star Fund.

The Role of Philanthropy In Shaping the Future

At this year's annual Social Impact Exchange conference Schott VP Edgar Villanueva spoke on a panel with other philanthropic leaders to discuss how philanthropic organizations can help address the systemic problems at the root of so many of the challenges we face, from education to health to economic mobility.

At this year's annual Social Impact Exchange conference Schott Vice President Edgar Villanueva spoke on a panel with other philanthropic leaders to discuss how funders can help address the systemic problems at the root of so many of the challenges we face, from education to health to economic mobility.

Panelists included:

Vox Interviews Edgar Villanueva on the Racial Philanthropy Gap

In a recent interview by Dylan Matthews at Vox, Schott Vice President of Programs and Advocacy Edgar Villanueva described how the racial wealth gap has translated to a similar gap in philanthropic giving: a bias in how that wealth is dispersed, which keeps control away from people of color, and minimizes donations to groups run by people of color for the benefit of communities of color.

In a recent interview by Dylan Matthews at Vox, Schott Vice President of Programs and Advocacy Edgar Villanueva described how the racial wealth gap has translated to a similar gap in philanthropic giving: a bias in how that wealth is dispersed, which keeps control away from people of color, and minimizes donations to groups run by people of color for the benefit of communities of color.

Building Power: How Philanthropy Can Support the Grassroots

Schott is very proud of our partnership with the Nellie Mae Education Foundation (NMEF) and our joint support for grassroots organizing as a critical strategy for ensuring all children have a fair and just opportunity to learn. NMEF’s recent report, Building Power: One Foundation’s Story of Funding Grassroots Organizing and Engagement, provides valuable insight into their theory of change and grantmaking designed to increase support for systems change within school districts and key state and local stakeholders—and build demand to realize that change. This rigorous examination and the lessons learned are an important catalyst to the dialogue within philanthropy about what it takes to foster authentic participation, and to effectively and equitably support grassroots organizing and advocacy. We urge you to read it—and join the dialogue!

Schott is very proud of our partnership with the Nellie Mae Education Foundation (NMEF) and our joint support for grassroots organizing as a critical strategy for ensuring all children have a fair and just opportunity to learn.

How to Be a Better Ally

Since its founding the Schott Foundation has worked to help build a broad-based movement to ensure all children have an opportunity to learn. Importantly, a movement led by the grassroots leaders in communities of color who are most impacted by educational inequities and other barriers to opportunity. It’s not arms-length philanthropy, but close working partnerships with our grantees and allies that undergirds all our work. Schott's Vice President of Programs & Advocacy, Edgar Villanueva, adds his insight in How To Be a Better Ally and Why It Matters.

Since its founding the Schott Foundation has worked to help build a broad-based movement to ensure all children have an opportunity to learn. Importantly, a movement led by the grassroots leaders in communities of color who are most impacted by educational inequities and other barriers to opportunity. It’s not arms-length philanthropy, but close working partnerships with our grantees and allies that undergirds all our work.

The College Cheating Scheme and the Broken Mirror of Philanthropy

by Edgar Villanueva, Schott Foundation Vice President of Programs and Advocacy

You would be hard-pressed to pick up a newspaper, scroll through an online media platform, or check social media without being bombarded with stories on the U.S. college admissions scandal. It’s been fodder for daytime and late-night television, grist for comedic satire, and a source of anger and frustration.

For millions of students who have gone out of their way to prove, often to a skeptical and disbelieving audience, that they earned their spot on campus, the scandal is a hard slap in the face. While some buy their way into college, others—especially students of color—have paid in blood, sweat, and tears.

You would be hard-pressed to pick up a newspaper, scroll through an online media platform, or check social media without being bombarded with stories on the U.S. college admissions scandal. It’s been fodder for daytime and late-night television, grist for comedic satire, and a source of anger and frustration.

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When it Comes to Best Practices for Philanthropy, We Know What Works

by Edgar Villanueva

Most people have a complex relationship with money. We either live in a state of perpetual lack, spend frivolously and without intention, or use it in ways that perpetuate harm. This is true for individuals and it is also true for institutions.

The way to change our relationship with money is to dissect and examine it. As the philanthropic sector, we need to be having frank conversations about where wealth came from, why it’s held back from public coffers, how it’s invested as an endowment, and who gets to manage, allocate and spend it.

As a Native American who has seen the ravages of colonialism and as someone who works in philanthropy, I know that understanding our historical relationship with wealth is not just a good idea; it is a moral imperative. No industry is immune from developing an unhealthy relationship to currency.

Originally published at Giving Compass.

Most people have a complex relationship with money. We either live in a state of perpetual lack, spend frivolously and without intention, or use it in ways that perpetuate harm. This is true for individuals and it is also true for institutions.

Schott's 2018 Impact

At the Schott Foundation we’ve been working for more than twenty-five years to support and empower the grassroots, community-centered organizations that are building movements strong enough to enact serious policy change. Here are a few ways to look at our impact in 2018 — which we're using to inform our 2019 strategy.

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